Deaf Game Review – Assassin’s Creed Brotherhood & Revelations

Assassin's Creed Brotherhood & Revelations Deaf Accessibility
3.9 / 6 Reviewer
Pros
All story dialogue is subtitled, subtitles have a dark background
Cons
No speaker labels makes the story very difficult to follow during conversations, text size may be far too small for some
Visual Representation of Dialogue
Visual Representation of Sound
Visual Cues
Controller Vibration

Good news, people! And I mean for me, the person writing the reviews, not you, the players. Assassin’s Creed Brotherhood and Revelations are essentially the same game as Assassin’s Creed II. You even play as the same guy for all three, Ezio.

With them being essentially the same game, unfortunately, Brotherhood and Revelations have all the same issues for Deaf/hoh accessibility that ACII had. Except for one…

Brotherhood opening scene with Ezio fighting a Templar.
Opening scene of Revelations showing Desmond with his eyes closed.

Both opening cutscenes are actually subtitled this time!

Revelations options menu
Brotherhood options menu

You also have the same bare-bones subtitle option of only being able to turn them on or off and select your language.

The biggest difference (and biggest disappointment) in both Brotherhood and Revelations when comparing them to ACII is that there seems to be significantly more back and forth dialogue between Ezio and various NPCs and it’s nearly impossible to follow because there are no speaker labels.

Ezio following his uncle Mario on horseback in Brotherhood

You see in the image above that the dialogue, without someone actually saying a name, it’s impossible to tell who said what and therefore, for me anyway, it’s very easy to lose interest in the story, as I’m not trying to do mental gymnastics to parse together a conversation.

The overall Deaf/hoh accessibility is the same as that of Assassin’s Creed II (see that review for a full breakdown) with the added confusion of even more speaker label-less back and forth dialogue, making the story incredibly hard to follow.